Hello AMLE 2017!

Our jetting about from conference to conference this month features many who pay attention to essential roles in kids’ lives. The people who work daily with middle school-aged students have a special place in our hearts. What essential and often energy-intensive work that requires!

Among the copious treasures we’re bringing to AMLE are many delightful (and educational) new titles from Tilbury House and What On Earth Books. These are books you (and your middle grade kids) will want to dive into in a literal kind of way: volumes of amazing and historically accurate events and six-foot-long accordion-folded records of history and science. You’ll end up curling into a corner of Booth 328 just so you can indulge yourself and make notes of classroom plans that jump immediately to mind.

What On Earth has partnered with the American Museum of Natural History to engage kids’ connections to deep dives into natural history with The Big History Timeline Wallbook. Other volumes in the series offer visually rich explorations of Shakespeare, science, and more. You’ll find the original Timeline books in our booth, as well as poster books and sticker books to keep kinesthetically eager middle schoolers engaged.

Tilbury House continues to extend its series of History in 50 with a new volume entitled A History of Ambition in 50 Hoaxes. Applications of the title to many parts of both the school and out-of-school day jump like popcorn. Among the hoaxes covered here in well-cited essays are the Cursed
Tomb of the Last Aztec Emperor, the Loch Ness monster, and Mark Twain’s own gag, a not-really-real account of finding a petrified man.

We’ll be at AMLE in the Exhibits Hall throughout the conference, eager to show you these and hundreds of other books from a wide variety of publishers. Come by Booth 328 and be prepared to fall in love with nonfiction all over again.

Pajama Press is ready to help you get active @NAEYC 2017

November around our office is, well–we’re not in the office much because it’s conference season! November is our time of year to bounce from place to place, meeting and greeting and sharing great kids’ books with teachers, librarians, and others who are meeting to make their association connections for the year.

One of our first stops this year is the 2017 National Association for the Education of Young Children and Pajama Press has just sent over early reading copies of three picture books just right for preschoolers and their adult helpers.

Jane Whittingham’s picture book story about Wild One, illustrated by Noel Tuazon, offers a delightfully inspiring romp through active verbs: our little Wild One hangs from the monkey bars like a bat, bounds like a puppy through the grass, and much more. Her many and wholehearted activities make this a great read for anyone heading off to play at the park–or just resting at home, tired from all the action.

Rainy day? A perfect time for baking Baby Cakes with picture book author Theo Heras and illustrator Renné Benoit! Words appear in huge type here, making this a fine choice for kids interested in connected letter recognition to support early reading efforts. Brother, sister, mom, and kitten have their work cut out to get the cake batter made. All turns out well, of course, and a tea party can follow. Good directions for both cake and baking with little ones are included, too.

Sanne Dufft‘s The Night Lion provides a terrific going-to-bed picture book about a brave knight of a boy who needs some assistance when his imagination plays mean tricks on him at night. What could be better company for a brave knight in this situation than a lion?!

From morning to night, sunny and rainy days alike, come by our booth to meet these three beautiful books and lots lots more! At NAEYC, you’ll find us at Booth 720.

Mysteries for Every Age

September 15 marks the birthday of renowned author Agatha Christie. To celebrate this esteemed writer, who penned 82 mystery novels, we have a hunch that you’re in the mood for some mysteries as well! From the classic whodunit to riddles of a stranger nature, mysteries offer great ways to spark curiosity in readers of all ages, encouraging them to find out what could happen next and if they can guess correctly. So, grab a magnifying glass and a handy notebook as we take a look at some of our favorite mysterious titles.

BB_Dougs Dogs

Will You Help Doug Find His Dog?

An interactive picture book title from Barefoot Books, Will You Help Doug Find His Dog? keeps readers guessing the answer to the very last page. Doug has lost his canine companion at the dog park and needs help finding him. After describing his four-legged friend to readers, Doug asks his audience to whistle, clap, and tickle their way through a group of dogs until the missing pup is found. Written by Jane Caston, and illustrated by Carmen Saldaña, this story encourages a playful response and will have little ones wanting to read it again.

There’s a Walrus in My Bed!AP_Walrus Bed

A young boy who is spending his first night in a big boy bed has a large problem in this picture book from Andersen Press, written and illustrated by Ciara Flood. Flynn keeps coming downstairs when he’s supposed to be asleep, claiming that the walrus needs food, blankets, or a glass of milk. In this case, the mystery is for the readers themselves to solve. Is the walrus just an excuse Flynn created, as his parents suspect, or could there really be a giant walrus in Flynn’s bed?

GP A Case in Any CaseDetective Gordon: A Case in Any Case

Ulf Nilsson and Gitte Spee’s beloved series follows Gordon, a toad detective, and his enterprising assistant, Buffy the mouse, as they take on curious cases. In the latest illustrated chapter book installment, published by Gecko Press, Buffy seeks out Gordon’s help to solve the mystery of strange noises coming from outside the police station each night. Once this mystery is solved, they can get back to what they love best, which includes drinking tea and stamping important papers.

FL_Artis Conan Doyle

 

The Artie Conan Doyle Mysteries: The Gravediggers’ Club

Robert J. Harris’ middle grade series harkens back to a different monumental mystery writer. The Artie Conan Doyle Mysteries from Floris Books imagines that the Sherlock Holmes stories were based on adventures that their author, Arthur Conan Doyle, had when he was a boy growing up in Edinburgh, Scotland. In the first installment, Artie and his best friend Ham follow the clues of a ghostly lady in grey and the pawprints of a gigantic hound to discover the secrets of the spooky Gravediggers’ Club.

 

 

PJ_Hummingbirds

 

The Theory of Hummingbirds

Alba has her eyes set on running in the sixth-grade cross-country race as soon as the final cast comes off her “directionally challenged” foot. She’s counting on support from her best friend, Levi, but he is consumed by his latest science obsession—wormholes. Is Levi just dreaming, or does the librarian really have a wormhole in her office? Written by Michelle Kadarusman and published by Pajama Press, this middle grade novel is about friendship, big challenges, and even bigger questions.

 

 

TB Sea ChangeSea Change

One season can change your life, a concept that twelve-year-old Eliot is learning daily as he spends his summer in a place he absolutely detests—Point Aconi, Nova Scotia. As Eliot learns how to perform the mundane tasks well-known to other residents of the small fishing town, he begins to realize that there is more to this seaside village than meets the eye. Why is Mary-Beth always reluctant to go home? How does Miss Gifford always know when trouble is brewing? What’s hidden in the pages of Great-great-grandfather Steen’s diary? Eliot wonders if he’ll find the answers to these prodding questions before the summer’s up. Written by critically-acclaimed author and artist Frank Viva, this work of graphic fiction is about broadening perspectives is published by Toon Books.

LF_Water Memory

Water Memory

When Marion and her mother inherit an old family house, complete with its own private beach, they see it as a wonderful opportunity for a new life. This graphic novel from Lion Forge, written by Mathieu Reynès with art from Valérie Vernay, follows Marion’s exploration of her new town as she begins to uncover unanswered questions and local legends haunting the surrounding area. What secrets are hidden away in the nearby lighthouse, and why does she feel an eerie tie to the lighthouse watchman? As time passes, Marion begins to wonder if this idyllic place isn’t nearly as peaceful as it first appeared.

 

IC_Plutona

 

Plutona

Five suburban children must fight to keep their world from tearing apart after they discover the body of the world’s most powerful superhero, Plutona, laying discarded in the woods near their school. As they wrestle with how to handle this weighty secret, their personal lives spin dangerously out of control. The real question—who killed Plutona?—lurks in the back of everyone’s mind, but the group of five might not be alive to uncover the whole story if they can’t solve their own problems soon. This dark coming-of-age tale from Image Comics is written by Emi Lenox and Jeff Lemire, with striking art by Emi Lenox and Jordie Bellaire.

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Grandparents Get a Day Too!

How are you celebrating National Grandparents Day, this Sunday, September 10? Grandparents can be amazing! As the caretakers of decades of wisdom, trusted perspectives, and tested values, they share great human riches with their families. Grandparents can be the keepers of communities. Daily, they nurture younger generations to encourage authentic and thoughtful people. Grandparents sometimes create communities under their own roofs, too, opening their homes and hearts to relatives who need a place to stay, whether it be for a short or extended amount of time. Grandparents can also be nurturing, adventurous, inspiring, and make lovable books to share across generations, and we want to celebrate them today.

Here are some books from our publishers for you and your little ones to enjoy for Grandparents Day.

I Love You, GrandmaTT_Love Grandma
This lyrical board book from Tiger Tales Books, with illustrations by Rory Tyger, pays tribute to the tender relationship that youngsters have with their grandmothers. Simple text on each page combines with soft illustrations to compose a beautiful poem about the undying love a grandmother has for her grandchild.

 

TH Melena's JubileeMelena’s Jubilee: The Story of a Fresh StartThe morning after a particularly bad day, Melena awakes with a new song in her heart. At breakfast, she shares the song with Gramma, and Gramma, in turn, shares some songs of her own. A story about forgiveness and second chances, Melena’s Jubilee is written by Zetta Elliot, illustrated by Aaron Boyd, and published by Tilbury House.

 

CP Ossiri and the Bala MengroOssiri and the Bala Mengro
After her parents explain that they can’t afford to buy Ossiri a musical instrument, the determined Traveler girl decides to create her own musical contraption. She calls it the Tattin Django, and despite the cacophony that emanates from its rustic body, Ossiri’s grandparents encourage her to keep practicing and playing what she feels is in her heart. Published by Child’s Play, this picture book is written by Richard O’Neill and Katharine Quarmby, with illustrations by Hannah Tolson.

How Nivi Got Her Names
Written by Laura Deal and illustrated by Charlene Chua, this story from Inhabit Media introduces traditional Inuit naming and Inuit custom adoption. Nivi’s mom tells her stories of the people for whom she is named, including the grandmother of one of her moms, the grandpa of her anaana (her other mom), and the grandmother of her puukuluk, or birth mother.

IM Nivis NamesPJ Waiting for Sophie

Waiting for Sophie
Liam relies on the creativity and carpentry skills of his grandma in this illustrated chapter book from Pajama Press, written by Sarah Ellis and illustrated by Carmen Mok. While Liam impatiently waits for his baby sister to grow into a playmate, Nana-Downstairs teaches him the basics of building and helps him to create a very special machine.

GP_GrandmaWhere Is Grandma?
This story of one boy’s odyssey through the hospital is written and illustrated by Peter Schossow and published by Gecko Press. While his nanny is distracted taking a phone call, Henry sets off on his own in search of his grandmother. He interacts with all kinds of people and overhears all sorts of conversations on his journey, but he won’t let anything stop him until finds his grandma.

 

FL_Top SecretTop-Secret Grandad and Me: Death by Tumble Dryer

Middle grade readers looking for a befuddling mystery and a good laugh can delight in a new series by the ever humorous David MacPhail and published by Floris Books. Eleven-year-old Jay Patel is off to solve the hilarious (no, really!) and wacky murders with the help of his (top-secret) ghost sidekick—who is none other than Jay’s grandad, Sanjeev!

 

Take a moment today to encourage children to spend time with their grandparents. Reading would be a great activity for them to do together. Make sure to snap a photo and post it on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. Feel free to tag us (@pubspotlight) and make sure you use #grandparentsday to show off your favorite intergenerational moments with books!

PRIDE in Our Publishers

June marks the celebrations of a number of events commemorating release from historic oppressions that come with the need to keep newfound respect alive. Juneteenth, for one, marks the news of the Emancipation Proclamation reaching African Americans whose slave holders failed to pass along the news when Abraham Lincoln first signed the law. Teens can download for free and to keep the  audiobook of W. E. B. DuBois’s classic The Souls of Black Folks through June 21 to hear about this period, as well as the period of Reconstruction, from the viewpoint of an African American Harvard scholar. This free audiobook, and another this week and two more each week through August 17, come courtesy of AudioFile Magazine. You can visit the program’s AudiobookSYNC site for full information.

BB_Baby's First WordsBarefoot Books celebrates inclusivity with Baby’s First Words, a board book that follows one busy baby and her two dads through a day full of exploration. Also available in Spanish as Mis primeras palabras, this title by Christiane Engel introduces younger audiences to a variety of nouns, verbs, adjectives, and phrases, giving a new spin to a classic first word book.

CP Clive and his Babies

Jessica Spanyol, author-illustrator of Child’s Play’s Clive series, offers early readers stories that gently challenge gender stereotypes. In these board books, Clive, a little boy with a big imagination, spends his days caring for his dolls, adding to his hat and bag collections, and pretending to be a librarian when his friends come over to play.

CP_Quiet

Child’s Play continues to sensitively handle gender with Quiet!, which pubs this fall. The picture book never designates a gender for its main character, a toddler who explores the range of sounds they hear as their day comes to an end. Auditory landmarks help all children to become familiar with daily routines, and can be particularly important to those who are blind or partially sighted. Inventive and inclusive, Quiet! is great for parents on the hunt for a picture book that doesn’t gender its protagonist.

TT_We Are Family

In We Are Family from Tiger Tales, sweet verse takes you through moments in the life of ten families, celebrating diversity through shared experiences. The families may look different—there is a single parent, a child in a wheelchair, a boy raised by his grandparents, two same-sex couples, and a variety of ethnic backgrounds represented—but through thick and thin, these families are all there for one another.

IM Nivis NamesHow Nivi Got Her Names is published by our friends at Inhabit Media and is a valuable exploration of traditional Inuit naming that also touches on Inuit custom adoption. Nivi, her mother Laura, her anaana (mother) Jesse, and their entire extended family are actual people; the picture book includes an introduction from Nivi’s birth mother Aviaq, and short biographies of the people for whom Nivi is named.

TH Real Sisters Pretend

In Tilbury House’s Real Sisters Pretend, written by Megan Dowd Lambert and illustrated by Nicole Tadgell, people often mistake Mia and Tayja as friends rather than sisters. Throughout this heartwarming picture book, Mia and Tayja spend the day playing make-believe and are comforted by the fact that adoption has made them and their two moms a “forever family,” and that they will always be sisters, even after playtime is over.

AL_Raven

Action Lab Entertainment offers readers another graphic novel adventure from the Princeless universe in Raven: The Pirate Princess, Book Three. After a violent confrontation on the Island of the Free Women, Raven and her crew are badly beaten, with one of their own near death. As Raven risks her life to find a legendary healer who may be able to save Ximena before it’s too late, her unspoken love for Ximena propels her onward.

oni_princess princess ever after

Princess Princess Ever After is all about girl power and flipping gender stereotypes on their head. From author-illustrator Katie O’Neill and Oni Press, this middle grade graphic novel follows princesses Sadie and Amira as they join forces to bring out the very best in one another and perhaps find a happily ever after together. Did we mention there are dancing trolls?

ONI_Tea Dragon Society

Also coming soon from Katie O’Neill and Oni is The Tea Dragon Society, a graphic novel about discovering the value in tradition and the strength in found families. A warm partnership between the two men who make up the Tea Dragon Society and a touch of flirting between protagonists Greta and Minette make this a great choice for readers looking for heartwarming, smile-inducing representation.

PJ Moon at Nine

Moon at Nine from Pajama Press tells the story of two girls who dare to dream of a life and future together. Stuck in a world that sees their love as a crime, Farrin and Sadira must keep their growing relationship a secret. Written by award-winning author Deborah Ellis, this novel is based on true events that took place in 1980s Iran.

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Hello, Orlando!

ALA HaikuWe’re looking forward to seeing all our library friends later this week at the American Library Association’s Annual Conference, in Orlando. Here’s an overview of what we’ll have to share with you, and an invitation to visit us at Booth 2239, where you know that, no matter who you are, we have smiles and good wishes to share with you.

The exhibits open on Friday, at 5:30. come join the festivities during this ribbon cutting reception! Our booth will be fully staffed all exhibit hours, which are are 9-5 on Saturday and Sunday, and 9-2 on Monday. Ellen, Jackson, and Claire Myrick, Along with Mary Burkey and Sharon Grover,will be on hand, with Francisca tweeting from various corners of the conference and booth events.

Oh, and booth events! We have in-booth signings scheduled throughout the weekend, booksignings adand staff will be participating in other exhibit happenings as well, including the Paizo
program in the Gaming Parlor, Saturday at 10:30, and a program focusing on diversity at 3 that afternoon.

Oh, and the books! We’ll be showing and talking about new titles from AMMO, Two Little Birds, Scotland’s Floris from Steiner, Flying Start, and Free Spirit Press; from Gannon& Wyatt, New Zealand’s Gecko Press, and Karadi Tales, Canada’s Pajama Press, Dutch publisher Lemniscaat; from No Starch Press, Phaidon, Tilbury House, and Tiger Tales. Then there are the audio publishers: L. A. Theatre Works, Live Oak Media, and Brilliance Audio, along with the Sound Learning literacy program from the Audio Publishers Association. Amazon imprints Thomas & Mercer, Lake Union, and Montlake Romance Authors, all for adults, and Two Lions, for kids, will also be at our fingertips–and could be at yours.

Follow us on Twitter @pubspotlight throughout the conference. Our first tip as you pack is to be sure to bring rain gear as showers and thunderstorms are predicted, right now, for every day of the conference.

And bring a smile and a hello! We know Orlando needs both right now and we always enjoy them ourselves and bet you do, too!

 

Hello, Texas!

We’re here at the Texas Library Association’s 2016 conference and having a blast (now that the rain has stopped)! Among some of new finds you can make at Booth 1630 are both children’s and adult graphic novels from a variety of publishers, including TOON, Papercutz, Fantagraphics, and NBM. Thanks to Diamond Bookshelf and IDW, we also have the new-to-America–and we think an award-winner here as well as in Europe–Paracuellos, by Carlos Giménez, which earned him the Heritage Award at the Paracuellos1_revAngoulème Festival in 2010. This is a memoir about a place and period American readers rarely meet in books: life in an orphanage during Franco’s dictatorship over Spain.

COVERLAYOUT.inddNBM, a comics publisher with a long and deep track record of providing North Americans with literary graphic novels, is just now releasing Guardians of the Louvre, acclaimed manga artist Jirô Taniguchi’s beautiful and compelling fantasy that seamlessly twines together many of the treasures in the Paris museum, and its environs, with the experiences of a lonely young tourist from Japan. I couldn’t put this one down from the moment I opened its beautiful watercolor-reminiscent right to left layout pages and met the young man as he, in turn, meets a variety of great figures from art’s history, including a countryside chat with Van Gogh and a tour of World War II’s art rescue history with the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Pair this one with Anthony Doerr’s 2015 Alex Award winning All the Light We Cannot See to bring vivid life to art history.

We have many other comics and graphic novels for you as well! Come visit–oh, and you might want to enter to win a whole basket of beautiful goodies!

A monstrously good read

Screen Shot 2016-03-08 at 8.52.55 AMTucking into Steven T. Seagle and Jason Adam Katzenstein’s Camp Midnight (Image Comics, 2016) offers a trip through those late tween/early teen years when, yes, everyone–except you–is a monster, adults are clueless, and even the ghost of childhood has its problems if you hang out with her too long. The action-packed and expressive panels fairly pop with morphing personalities as the mean girls go witchy and the cute boy turns into a hairy wolf. The palette is vivid and offers another layer of that too-bright feeling with which a good dose of hormones can shock your pubescent system.

Screen Shot 2016-03-08 at 9.00.31 AMThe storyline features Skye, truculent about everything in her life and especially her divorced dad’s new wife and the camp where they’ve dared to send her for the summer. Screen Shot 2016-03-08 at 8.54.04 AMRun by a witch, who turns out to be both wise and kind, and literally overrun by kids who aren’t afraid to show their “true”–emerging–selves, Skye deals with being out of her depth by whining, screaming, and, eventually, taking up the challenge to grow up.

This one’s perfect for both middle schoolers and anyone who is willing to revisit that stage in life to get a funny, articulate handle on the sheer and terrifying messiness of it all. For the former group, there’s reassurance, and for the rest of us, an easy to swallow dose of sympathy-building memories.

And oh yeah, it’s coming to us for Free Comic Book Day, this year on 7 May, so there are positively no excuses for not getting yourself a copy!

Rediscovering local history

Cathy Forde, who’s both popular with readers ages eight to twelve, and  with literary Screen Shot 2016-03-01 at 4.37.54 AMcritics, may be best known in the US for Fat Boy Swim and The Drowning Pool. In 2001, she published Think Me Back, which I frankly can’t remember happening across here across the pond.

Instead of living a life of reader regrets, however, I’m delighted to discover The Blitz Next Door, which is a revision and republication of that 2001 title, wonderfully immediate and so gentle in its updating of details marking the present that I know it had to be Floris Books behind this 2015 Kelpies edition. Let me share it with you:

 

You can visit our Activities pages to find some discussion and engagement support for including this novel in book discussions and other programs.

Booktalk transcript

The Blitz Next Door, by Cathy Forde, for readers 8-12

Pete is far from thrilled to arrive in in Clydebank, Scotland, far away from home in London: he’s had to leave his best friends, his baby sister is cranky and colicky, his mother is depressed, and Dad seems way more interested in pleasing his new boss than making sure his family gets comfortable.

The house is nice, though: way bigger than their London flat, and Pete gets his own room. However, it’s not enough, apparently, that Pete’s sister is crying; on the other side of the wall in Pete’s new room, there’s another crying girl, too, only she talks as well, telling her mum that she really won’t get packed and ready to move. And sometimes she plays the recorder.

When Pete’s dad shows him the old air raid shelter in the garden, and tells Pete he can have it for his own den, Pete’s thrilled. Looking back at his new home, above the crater near the air raid shelter, however, he realizes that … there can’t be a girl next door because there is no next door. The bomb that made this crater 75 years ago demolished that house. So where is that weeping girl? And who is she?

Soon enough, Pete has a new friend, a neighborhood boy named Dunny who shares his passion for football. He seems to have another new friend as well. The girl in the house that isn’t there any longer next door appears in the air raid shelter, come to write in her journal, which Dunny himself found before Pete’s arrival in Clydebank, or to play with the boys’ football figurines when they aren’t around. But Pete sees her, and even talks with her.

How can that be? How can there be a house where there is no house, a girl who would have to now be an old woman, if she survived the bombing?

Pete’s story is vivid and studded with just enough historical facts to send readers scrambling to read more about the World War II bombing known as the Clydebank Blitz, on March 13, 1941, and other events that truly do echo into the 21st century. Pete and the girl, Beth, do have a connecting point in the present as well, and that allows them to bring her haunting of her old and ruined home to rest.

A note about the second edition: This story easily works 15 years after its original publication. Gentle editing to add such details as Pete’s preoccupied father as texting when he might better be conversing with his wife or his son make it feel very much of the moment. With this being the 75th anniversary of an event that killed over 500 Scottish civilians, damaged or destroyed about 12,000 houses, and left 35,000 homeless, yet still escaping much notice except locally even today, it offers a great opportunity to jumpstart studies of local history.

The Blitz Next Door, by Cathy Forde, is published by Kelpies, a Floris Books Imprint, 2015. Originally published 2001 as Think Me Back and available in paperback and e-book. It’s 172 pages.